If you think it would be pretty cool to see your photography or your kid's artwork on the 2002 Montana Fishing Regulations handbook, here's your chance.

This annual contest gives both children and adults opportunities to demonstrate what they think best represents Montanans' love for fishing. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is still taking entries for their annual fishing regulation photo and kids’ art contest. Winners will see their work on the front and back cover of the 2022 fishing regulation booklets.

All submitted photos will be considered for the contest, but the department will give special consideration to photos that highlight the diversity of people and fishing opportunities that Montana has to offer.

The photo must be vertical (portrait) mode, or suitable for tight vertical cropping to fit the available space on the regulations front cover. The photo must be a minimum resolution and size of 6 inches tall at 300 pixels-per-inch.

Montana FWP will feature your name on the front cover as credit. You are asked to  include a short description of the photo for caption information. Ownership of the photo is retained by the photographer, who may use his/her image for other purposes.

Please do not send photos of fish that have been mounted. And make sure your photo was taken in Montana.

On to the kiddos:

For the back cover art contest, kids 12 and younger are invited to submit a colored drawing of a fish that lives in Montana.

Prizes will be awarded to both winning photographer and youth artist. Entry deadline is October 15. You can submit your entries via email to fwpphotocontest@mt.gov.

Good luck all you artistic Montana types!

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